Your Questions About What Are Triglycerides Used For

Here is Readers’ Q & A about the basics of triglycerides and some concern about triglyceride levels. Often time you may have the same questions so it may be helpful to read what others are concerned about.

Daniel asks…

HDL CHOLESTEROL 30. WHAT TO DO?

I am concern about my blood profle. My numbers are Chol 204, HDL 30
LDL 112, TRIGLYCERIDES 190. I use to take a statin Simvastatin , but not anymore. Can anyone tell me if these numbers are bad, I know for a fact HDL is bad. I am 57, male thin built. Any ideas would be appreciated.
THanks
ART

Sheila answers:

All the values have come to borderline & some of them more… But since you are 57 years old, as per latest American Heart association Guidelines, its suggested to bring down the LDL level to less than 100. Thats the ideal target which is to be reached… For a safe outcome..

And remember, HDL will also rise with these drugs..

You didn’t say why you are no longer taking the Simvastatin but your levels can be brought to a healthy normal, assuming yours is not a result of genetics, with diet and exercise.

Robert asks…

Triglycerides…?

Hello, I have a question about triglycerides. Well, more like a general bit of confusion. I have an excellent trig level, just confirmed by fasting blood tests, so I’m not worried, but when I look up info about trigs something doesn’t make sense to me. It is my understanding that stored trigs are released into the blood when fuel is needed. Yet I read just about everywhere that low (not too low…low on the GOOD range) indicate that I’m burning what I eat for energy, have a low fat diet, etc. But wouldn’t that mean, when my trigs are released, they would be HIGHER? Wouldn’t they be stored up because I haven’t been using them, but rather, burning what I eat already? I’m sorry if this questions sounds really stupid…but in everything I’ve researched I really don’t see why lower is better (I’m glad it is but I just don’t understand how it works! Thanks!)

Sheila answers:

Yes, you triglycerides DO in fact rise after meals, mostly depending on what you eat. Triglycerides are simply your body’s way of transporting lipids, as they neutralize free fatty acids (which are potentially dangerous). Neutral fats (triglycerides) can be safely transported in the blood and stored as fat cells. This is why you have to fast for 12 hours before they can perform a blood test.

There will always be some level of triglycerides floating in your bloodstream because your body is always using energy. The low levels that you have mean that you are in a good balance- you are using what you are consuming. And you are consuming what you need. There is still some in storage but not such an excessive amount that your fasting triglyceride level is above normal.

I hope I answered your question and cleared your confusion!

Sandra asks…

Weight gain?

I don’t know what to do anymore. I am seeing an endo for my low (60) and somewhat high (200) sugar level. They can’t find anything wrong. My worst symptoms arethe shakes and near faint. We noticed that my triglycerides are high. I use to weight 110 lbs and now I weight 119lbs over 1 month. I am not doing anything different. I had to buy bigger clothes. I’m scared. Diet does not work too, because my shakes are really bad. Is this normal? Nobody is worried, because they thought I was skinny at 110lbs 5ft 1in. But 10 lbs in 1 month and not fitting in my clothes anymore … Thanks

:-)


I am a women 27 yrs old
Two GTT done
1st 2 hr at 187mg
2nd 2 hr at 127 mg

Thank you

Sheila answers:

You haven’t said what tests have been done in addition to your blood tests but it sure sounds like you are doing the right thing by seeing an endocrinologist.

Continue to work with the endocrinologist until you find the cause of your problem. If this doctor can’t find it, go see another.

Endocrinology is a complicated field of medicine. Diagnosing your problem may take some time. It could be your hormones, your thyroid, your pituitary gland, who knows? Don’t give up.

If you can, get a thorough family history and make sure your doctor is aware of it.

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